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Long-Acting Injectables

Long-acting injectables (LAIs) can help treat certain mental health illnesses. Ask your doctor if an LAI is an option for you.

Female nurse administering injectable medication into a female patient

The Benefits of Long-Acting Injectables

If you have a mental health illness such as bipolar disorder or schizophrenia, your illness may make it hard to remember to take your oral medicines every day.

LAIs can solve that problem by allowing for the slow release of medicine into the bloodstream. LAIs are given by a nurse or doctor as an injection every two to 12 weeks, depending on the medicine. This can help you manage your medicines and avoid setbacks in your mental health treatment.

Possible Side Effects

Before you switch to an LAI, discuss the potential side effects of your new medicine with your doctor. These side effects may be different from the medicine you are currently taking.

Approval May be Necessary

Before you switch to an LAI, your doctor must first check to see if Horizon needs to review the request for the new medicine and approve it for coverage. This way, you’ll know that the medicine will be covered before starting your shots.

Getting your LAI Shot

Your doctor or nurse will give you your LAI shot, usually in the doctor’s office. Certain pharmacies in New Jersey can also provide these injections. Check with your local pharmacy to see if they provide this service.

Financial Assistance May be Available

Some drug manufacturers offer coupons or other types of financial assistance to help cover the cost of LAIs. You can check the drug manufacturer’s website to see what may be available to you. The manufacturer, not Horizon, will determine if you qualify for financial assistance and what, if any, guidelines you will need to follow.

Asking for help can be challenging, but you are not alone.

Call Horizon Behavioral Health to help you navigate the support you need at 1-800-626-2212 (TTY 711), 24/7.

If you are having an urgent mental health crisis, call 911 or visit an emergency room as soon as possible.